Do You Really Need a Financial Advisor?

submitted by Tim Goodwin

Contrary to what you may think, financial independence doesn't necessarily mean independently making financial decisions. Instead, it's about working toward your bigger, better future by relying on the assets and resources at your disposal. For many, asking for help from a trusted partner or advisor is part of that journey. So, before you decide whether or not you need a financial advisor, here are three things you should consider. 

How close is retirement? 

As you move toward retirement, you may start wondering if you'll have enough. However, the best time to ask that question is well before you announce the end of your 9 to 5 life. Long before you file with the Social Security Administration, consider hiring a financial advisor. They can help you navigate the complexities of monthly benefits and make sure you get the most money possible. They can also help you identify opportunities to give back and work with you to prepare your financial legacy. 

How much free time do you have? 

Managing time is never easy and depending on your job, you may have little free time. With what time you do have, you need to decide how you want to use those off-work hours. Balancing a budget, shepherding your investments and preparing for the future may help you unwind from the stress of your day job. However, if your to-do list is already unmanageable, consider finding some outside help. 

What is your net worth? 

Deciding whether or not to hire a financial advisor often comes down to the numbers on your personal balance sheet. If the annual costs outweigh the expected earnings, then there is no need to hire a professional full-time. Instead, consider one-on-one coaching sessions that will help you plan out your bigger, better future. However, once you have at least $100,000 available to invest, work with a financial advisor to select investments that are right for you. A qualified financial professional can help you maximize your portfolio and protect your hard-earned money.  

Decision-time 

Once you consider those questions, you'll have a better idea of whether or not you need a financial advisor. For many people, it's about when, not if. If you don't currently have one, keep coming back to these questions. Whether today, next year or ten years from now, when the time is right, a financial advisor can help you take your pursuit of financial freedom to the next level.